7th October 2012

“Once bitten, twice shy.”

English idiom

This phrase isn’t technically a quote but has always intrigued me. Although I’ve heard it said and generally knew what it meant I always felt a bit unsure of using the phrase. I was doing some research for a bit of French homework and I came across the equivalent: “chat échaudé craint l’eau froide.” It is with this that I gained some clarity into the phrase. It literally translates as ‘a scalded cat fears cold water’. Have you ever felt so hurt or afraid by something that you fear that the solution will just be more painful? Then I guess there are things you can’t bear to do again because of the amount of  upset it may bring you: once bitten, twice shy.

17th July 2012

“Be calm like a duck. Calm on the surface, but always paddling like the dickens underneath.”

Michael Caine

I think I’m getting quite good at having my ‘calm and collected’ face at the ready, especially in times that are not at all as such. I haven’t worked out whether it is a good or a bad thing yet – people can’t tell if something is upsetting me or stressing me out but at the same time I can appear very together. It reminds me of a Desperate Housewives episode I recently saw, where Bree’s mother taught Bree to always have her ‘face’ on – as it would give her control in situations. Perhaps it makes people’s reactions less genuine though?

16th May 2012

“You can think you know someone and then they say something or do something and suddenly everything changes.” 

Carrie Ryan, The Dead-Tossed Waves

Sometimes, all it takes it one remark, one statement or a few tiny (seemingly harmless) little words from someone to change your opinion on them. If your opinion changes for the better, then it goes to show how you can never truly know someone, no matter how much you thought you did – it is a welcome surprise. If your opinion changes for the worse, it still goes to show how you can’t truly know them – but it hurts more, because of how you valued them in your life.